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The middle way to eating (intuitive eating)

September 30, 2014

I’ve not read the below book, but I like the way it’s talking about food, because although I’ve needed to change my diet in all sorts of radical ways during this healing process I find myself in, I actually do have a practice around food that looks much like what this quote from this book speaks to. I am actually quite flexible within the restrictions I have no choice but to impose while my body heals. I am not generally afraid of food and I routinely introduce new foods as I heal. It’s been an amazing and lovely learning journey in so many ways. When people have very real food intolerances finding one’s way back to moderation and flexibility can be a challenge, but it’s not impossible. One thing I’ve needed to do is not care what others think. I have some very real intolerances and there really are foods I cannot eat for the time being. That is okay. It is real. We can still find what flexibility means for us even if that is the case with some foods for us.

mindful eating'How does the middle way apply to eating and food? It teaches that extremes are unskillful and will not bring the ease in life that we are looking for. It advises that rigid control and self-denial will not be healthy and will not lead to happiness. Neither will indulging our desires and always doing what is pleasurable. There is a middle way with food. It is not static, a fixed set of rules. To apply to the changing circumstances of a human life it must be dynamic, flexible.

This might seem difficult at first. It might seem easier to follow black-and-white rules such as “Never eat sugar” or “Always eat what you crave.” Sometimes sugar is appropriate to eat. Sometimes we shouldn’t eat what we feel like eating.

It takes a while to learn to navigate our way down the path of the middle way. We need a compass point toward health and happiness, a map of spiritual teachings, a group to support us, and a guide. Above all we need mindfulness.  — Jan Chozen Bays, from Mindful Eating: A Guide to Rediscovering a Healthy and Joyful Relationship with Food

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

 

Multi-colored beets with cilantro and hemp seed pesto

September 29, 2014

Fresh cut beets look like candy!

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Roasted with garlic and onion too.

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Topped with cilantro and hemp seed pesto.

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Cut the beets in cubes with the garlic and onion and toss with some ghee or coconut oil (or any oil/fat you like to roast with). Roast in the oven at 400 degrees for up to 40 minutes. Check them once or twice to toss them about and see if they’re done.

The pesto recipe:

  • 1 bunch cilantro (if you don’t like cilantro use another fresh herb or green — basil, dill, kale, beet greens, or fennel greens for example)
  • Olive oil (just enough to make it pesto-like)
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1/3 cup hemp seeds
  • salt to taste

Puree it all up in a food processor and put it over the already cooked beets. Toss it up. That’s all!

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

 

Butternut squash pasta — grain free, vegan, tomato free (oh my)

May 22, 2014

butter

So I julienned a butternut squash. Julienne peelers are pretty awesome. I use them with zucchini and sweet potatoes too. I intend to experiment further with other veggies as well. This is actually the one I have. I borrowed the picture to the right from google because I failed to take a photo. The picture of the actual finished dish is what I made, however.

I put onion, celery, carrots, one small beet, garlic, parsley and basil in a food processor first…then the grated raw veggies were sautéed and browned in ghee for about 45 minutes…then at the end I added a cashew cream (soak cashews for 4 hours and then blend in the blender — I used half a cup of nuts which came to about a cup of cream) with some hemp seeds also tossed in…with some additional raw garlic…. (the dish is basically a vegan –save for the ghee– and if you don’t want to use the ghee you can use a non-dairy substitute and voila it’s a tomato free, grain free, pasta dish).

Yes, my histamine intolerance makes me get quite creative in the kitchen.

Photo on 1-22-14 at 12.14 PM #2I tossed the “noodles” into the hot veggies for a couple of minutes to take the crunch off. You can heat them as long as you like. I ate them pretty much raw and like them that way. My husband preferred them cooked a bit.

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

 

Apple, caramelized onion and ginger chutney

February 12, 2014

A recipe in tweets.

I announced what I was cooking in a tweet:

apple, carmelized onion and ginger chutney currently cooking on stove…

Someone requested the recipe and so I tweeted the following:

recipe: it’s really yummy…eating it now…as a main course actually…I made it up on the fly…I’ll do my best with a recipe

3 large apples, one large red onion (sliced thin and caramelized first in ghee) sliced up the apples and added them next

added a quarter cup of water let it come to furious boil and then turned it down to simmer for 15 minutes.

oh…I also added a tsp of nigella sativa seeds and grated some fresh ginger in before simmering

when it was all soft I smashed up the apples a bit…and added 1 tsp of salt (or whatever you need to taste)

served it topped with hemp seeds…and a bit more ghee.

That’s really how I cook…things just kind of happen on the fly. This turned out very nice and I will be repeating it.

 

Socca flat bread with cilantro pesto (grain free)

December 18, 2013

This is a variation on this flatbread I made a few posts back.

Socca flat bread with cilantro pesto

Socca flat bread with cilantro pesto

Today I only made enough for one serving so I used 1/4 cup of chick pea (garbanzo bean) flour. I tossed in half a small onion, a large garlic clove and a teaspoon of chia seeds. (yes I go crazy with variations) I didn’t cook the onion or the garlic, I just tossed them all together with a tablespoon of olive oil and some salt and pepper too and then I blended it all with my immersion blender (my favorite small kitchen appliance).

I made it in a ten inch cast iron pan in the oven.

The pesto was very simple as well. Cilantro, olive oil, garlic and salt. In a small food processor. Again, just enough for this one person meal.

Simple, delicious.

For more info and a recipe go here.

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

Sweet potato “grits” (paleo & grain-free)

December 17, 2013

Paleo grits (grain free) sweet potato and appleOdd but wonderful concoction: blended sweet potato, apple, chia seeds and LOTS of garlic…baked the “batter” in cast iron pan till crispy. It turned out tasting vaguely of baked or fried grits or polenta, both foods I miss but can no longer eat. This was a delightful surprise as I made it up totally on the fly with no real sense of what the final product would be like. You know what they say about the mother of invention. I need variation and diversity in my diet and so I am forever playing with new ingredients. My diet may be restricted in certain regards, but I make it a habit to add new foods I’ve never tried before as well as new combos all the time. This means I don’t generally feel deprived as I’m always eating new and delicious foods.

So this is what I did to create this dish. As usual I don’t have a precise recipe because I’m pretty much always in spontaneous create mode.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI cut up one sweet potato, one apple and a HUGE clove of garlic (it was elephant garlic, so you can use three cloves of normal garlic) and tossed it all into a food processor. Then I added two tablespoons of chia seeds and just a wee bit of water (maybe a 1/4 cup). I added a bit of ghee and salt and pepper and blended it until it was nice and grainy but not totally smooth.

I heated the cast iron pans on the stove and put ghee in the bottom of the heated pan. (you can use any cooking fat or oil you prefer. I stay away from industrial seed oils –corn, cottonseed, soybean, safflower, sunflower, etc.– because they’re not healthy) Once the oil and pan are hot I spooned the very thick batter into the pan and flattened it out then put the pans into the oven at 400 degrees.

I cooked them for about 15 minutes and then brushed the top lightly with ghee and broiled it for about 5 minutes. The time is going to vary depending on how much of the batter is in the pan. That varies according to the size of the potatoes and apples. Experiment and have fun…it’s really good if you get a nice browned crust going on both the top and bottom.

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

 

Sweet potato chips (fried in coconut oil) homemade not so bad “junk food”

December 16, 2013

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHad a hankering for something crunchy and I haven’t eaten chips of any variety in eons (literally several years) …so I did the only thing I could do in this circumstance…I deep fried my own sweet potato chips in coconut oil… photographed below is one of the batches…I ate each batch as the next batch fried…I’m shameless…

They were good. They would have been better had I had a mandolin to slice them. They were a bit thick.

Recipe is simple. Slice sweet potato. Fry in coconut oil. You do need a lot of coconut oil. It should be about 1/2 inch deep to start. Add more later if you’re frying lots of batches. Add a bit of salt. They’re good.

This was a treat. I don’t eat any processed foods and heck, I wanted something a bit decadent.

If you don’t want to be this decadent you could try baking them.

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