Skip to content

Fixing our diets and our exercise patterns

October 5, 2014
healthy

This is a pretty good all round introduction on how to start making big changes to lifestyle. It takes time and so baby steps are most often quite appropriate and even necessary for long-term success. If you’ve wanted to make changes and don’t know where to start this video can function as a sort of intro to such ideas.

-

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

 

healthy

Wild dandelion and radicchio salad

October 4, 2014
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

My breakfast this morning.

I went out and harvested the “weeds” from my garden. Dandelion is good food and grows abundantly in my part of the world and many other parts too. I’ve been eating wild dandelion since I was a child.

The radicchio I bought at the grocery store.

I dressed the salad simply with olive oil and salt. Both the dandelion and the radicchio are bitter greens and so I like them dressed really simply like this. You can certainly add lemon or vinegar or any other salad dressing you like.

See from Treehugger: Please eat the dandelions: 9 edible weeds

Two more recipes from Beyond Meds with dandelion greens:

 

Wild dandelion and radicchio salad

Wild dandelion and radicchio salad

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

The Secrets of Food Marketing

October 3, 2014

The power of willful ignorance. You think you’re immune? Think again.

Think you aren’t being fooled by advertising tricks?

Take a look at this so-called expert revealing food marketing’s secret weapon.

-

It’s really easy to always blame others about the ills in the world. The fact is we’re complicit in hundreds of ways. As we become conscious we feel the pain and spread ideas and the hope for a better way.

Some related posts:

Mango cheese cake (raw, vegan, paleo and OMG yummy)

October 2, 2014
mango-cheese-cake

As much as it seems to annoy some people, I do like tweeting what I’m up to in the kitchen. Sometimes people ask me for recipes. I generally don’t use recipes. I throw things together on the fly based on whims. Sometimes that works out real well. It did this time. So I patched together a recipe of sorts below. Clearly it’s not totally precise but if you like to experiment in the kitchen it’s enough to do that with.

So, a twitter recipe:

First the crust:

I suggest also putting about 1/2 tsp of salt in the crust.

Make sure the mango is really ripe. If it is you really don’t need to add any sweetener at all. The dates in the crust and the mango is really plenty. Though adding sweeteners and sugar is always an option if that’s what you prefer.

It’s best when just partially frozen. It was incredibly creamy and ice-cream like. Very delicious.

mango cheese cake

 

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

 

 

Salmon on a bed of parsley, garlic, burdock root and artichoke hearts

October 1, 2014
salmon

I don’t tolerate fish oil in supplement form, nor any other Omega 3 supplement so I was thrilled to learn I do okay with flash frozen (right upon catch) salmon…(histamine intolerance has its challenges) and Omega 3 fatty acids are very important to heal the iatrogenically injured brain — anyway…this was breakfast a few days ago:

Piece of salmon on top of a bed of burdock root, garlic, parsley & artichoke hearts.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Traditional breakfast foods are pretty much all foods I can’t eat at the moment. That doesn’t stop me from eating well. In fact nothing about having some restrictions has stopped me from eating well. I’ve simply expanded my horizons (after initial elimination procedures to learn about what I could eat which necessitates cutting out most foods, briefly. Then one adds foods back in…a process I’m still involved in, actually, but I’ve learned to eat many foods I hadn’t eaten before as well). The only thing that remains frustrating is that it’s really difficult to eat in a restaurant. My kitchen, however, is filled with delightful, healthy and varied foods.

All I did was roughly chop up the large flat-leafed Italian parsley, thinly slice the burdock root and garlic and then toss it all in the bottom of a small baking pan with a little ghee. You can use any cooking oil or fat you prefer. I then placed the salmon on top of the mixture, still frozen and then covered the pan and baked it at 350 for 35 minutes. So easy, simply and delicious.

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

 

The middle way to eating (intuitive eating)

September 30, 2014

I’ve not read the below book, but I like the way it’s talking about food, because although I’ve needed to change my diet in all sorts of radical ways during this healing process I find myself in, I actually do have a practice around food that looks much like what this quote from this book speaks to. I am actually quite flexible within the restrictions I have no choice but to impose while my body heals. I am not generally afraid of food and I routinely introduce new foods as I heal. It’s been an amazing and lovely learning journey in so many ways. When people have very real food intolerances finding one’s way back to moderation and flexibility can be a challenge, but it’s not impossible. One thing I’ve needed to do is not care what others think. I have some very real intolerances and there really are foods I cannot eat for the time being. That is okay. It is real. We can still find what flexibility means for us even if that is the case with some foods for us.

mindful eating'How does the middle way apply to eating and food? It teaches that extremes are unskillful and will not bring the ease in life that we are looking for. It advises that rigid control and self-denial will not be healthy and will not lead to happiness. Neither will indulging our desires and always doing what is pleasurable. There is a middle way with food. It is not static, a fixed set of rules. To apply to the changing circumstances of a human life it must be dynamic, flexible.

This might seem difficult at first. It might seem easier to follow black-and-white rules such as “Never eat sugar” or “Always eat what you crave.” Sometimes sugar is appropriate to eat. Sometimes we shouldn’t eat what we feel like eating.

It takes a while to learn to navigate our way down the path of the middle way. We need a compass point toward health and happiness, a map of spiritual teachings, a group to support us, and a guide. Above all we need mindfulness.  – Jan Chozen Bays, from Mindful Eating: A Guide to Rediscovering a Healthy and Joyful Relationship with Food

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

 

Multi-colored beets with cilantro and hemp seed pesto

September 29, 2014

Fresh cut beets look like candy!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Roasted with garlic and onion too.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Topped with cilantro and hemp seed pesto.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

-

Cut the beets in cubes with the garlic and onion and toss with some ghee or coconut oil (or any oil/fat you like to roast with). Roast in the oven at 400 degrees for up to 40 minutes. Check them once or twice to toss them about and see if they’re done.

The pesto recipe:

  • 1 bunch cilantro (if you don’t like cilantro use another fresh herb or green — basil, dill, kale, beet greens, or fennel greens for example)
  • Olive oil (just enough to make it pesto-like)
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1/3 cup hemp seeds
  • salt to taste

Puree it all up in a food processor and put it over the already cooked beets. Toss it up. That’s all!

Eating wholesome whole real food is important for body/mind/spirit health and well-being. I’ve written a lot about my adventure with diet and healing here:  Nutrition and gut health, Mental health and diet

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 66 other followers

%d bloggers like this: